The impact of relative humidity on ESD

A video making the rounds on Social Media this week highlights a very common problem in ESD Protection: dry air.
The report shows energy minister Simon Bridges walking around his office spraying the floor with water, applying tape to door handles and using an antistatic mat at his desk. The reason? Simple: a new carpet which was installed at the Beehive and the “little tickles” ministers are getting as a result.

SImon Bridges spraying the floor in his office with water
Simon Bridges spraying the floor in his office with water (Source)

Jim Robb who is in charge of maintaining the parliament building provides the following explanation: “We’re in the middle of winter, we’ve got cold polar air, there’s no moisture in it and it’s a very common problem, I’ve been dealing with this for thirty years.”

While the ministers at the Beehive seem to have figured out solutions to avoid the “zap”, we want to show you how you can solve the issue of dry air in your EPA.

Impact of relative humidity on ESD

Just like the ministers in the above report, many people will notice a difference in the ability to generate static electricity when the air gets dryer (the % RH decreases).
Relative humidity (RH) directly affects the ability of a surface to store an electrostatic charge. As RH increases, the time a surface will hold a charge will decrease and the dissipation rate will increase. 

An example: walking across a carpet can yield a charge of 35kV at 10% RH (very dry air) but will drop significantly to 7.5kV at 55% RH. In an electronics manufacturing environment lower humidity may result in lower output from production due to an increase in ESD events during manufacturing processes.

A normal range for humidity in an electronics manufacturing environment is be between 30% RH and 70% RH. Some facilities try to maintain a constant moderate RH (~50%), whereas other environments may want lower % RH due to corrosion susceptibility to humidity sensitive parts.
The recommended humidity range is usually determined by the specifications of the devices and components being assembled. Increasing the humidity in an electronics manufacturing facility can help to reduce ESD events but increased humidity can lead to other unwanted quality issues in sn electronics manufacturing environment such as corrosion, soldering defects and the popcorn effect on moisture sensitive devices.

The popcorn effect
The popcorn effect (Source)

Dealing with dry air in an EPA

While not a replacement for grounding, shielding or ESD working surfaces, ionisation can mitigate ESD events in areas where dry air is normal. For more information on ionisation and the different types of ionisers, we recommend reading these two posts:

In summary, worksurface ionisers (Bench Top and Overhead Ionisers) produce positively and negatively charged ions that are moved to the controlled area with fan driven airflow. Point-of-use air ionisers use compressed gas to combat electrostatic attraction neutralising charges on particles causing contamination or visual defects on products.

Using a point-of-use air ioniserUsing a point-of-use air ioniser

The ESD Standard on Relative Humidity

The ESDA’s TR20.20-2008 discusses RH in a few different places. Some significant statements are listed below.

ESD Handbook ESD TR20.20-2008 section 2.3 Nature of Static Electricity:
The moisture level in the air, or relative humidity in the environment, are important considerations in the liberation and accumulation of static electricity. It is well known that static electricity in the form of static cling and static shocks are more prevalent when the air is dry. Heating interior air in the winter months dries out the already dry air in the higher latitudes. Static charge accumulation is easier on dry materials since moisture on surfaces tends to allow charges to slowly dissipate or recombine.
However, it is impractical to use humidity control alone to provide static control since static charges are developed even at relative humidity levels of 90% and greater. For most situations, 30 to 70% RH is considered the appropriate range. Special areas, such as wafer fabrication, may require lower humidity control for processes that are affected by moisture (e.g., photoresist application). Soldering is known to be affected by high relative humidity conditions (>70%). For areas that have low ambient humidity, ionization is an important consideration to aid in reducing charge accumulation levels and provide neutralization of charges after they are developed but before they can cause difficulties.

ESD Handbook ESD TR20.20-2008 section 5.3.16 Humidity:
Humidity is beneficial in all ESD control program plans. Contact and separation of dry materials generates greater electrostatic charges than moist materials because moisture provides conductivity that helps to dissipate charge. For this reason, ESD effects are most noticeable in the winter since heating systems reduce building environment moisture. Geographic location (desert vs. coastland) is also a major contributor to ambient conditions inside buildings. Any circumstance that results in a low relative humidity will permit a greater accumulation of electrostatic charges. Relative humidity above 30% in ESD protective areas is desirable as long as other adverse conditions are not created as a result of humidity levels. Generally speaking an upper limit of 70% is desirable to prevent corrosive effects on the metal portions of electronic devices and assemblies.
Besides the increasing propensity to generate electrostatic charges on dry materials in general, performance of many ESD protective materials degrade. In fact, when exposed to low humidity conditions, some ESD protective materials become totally ineffective or become sources of electrostatic charges. Therefore, evaluation of ESD control materials should include performance testing in controlled environments at the lowest expected operating relative humidity level. Manufacturers of ESD protective materials should be able to provide performance data in regards to relative humidity. Likewise, materials should be tested in moderate humidity conditions as well to ensure they do not become “too conductive” and present a potential safety hazard to personnel working with substantial voltages. See the Personnel Safety section of this handbook for further guidance in this area.
Humidity control in factories or physically large areas or buildings can be difficult and expensive. In smaller rooms or areas, it may be possible to use portable humidifiers to raise the immediate area humidity. However, in large facilities and factories the environmental systems many need to include steam generation and monitoring equipment to control humidity. This type of equipment is expensive to install and purchase especially in pre-existing facilities. To reduce the total cost impact, companies should consider the need for humidification equipment when planning new facility construction.

ESD TR20.20-2008 can be purchased directly from the ESD Association.

About Vermason

Vermason is a manufacturer of ESD protection products and was founded in Letchworth in 1979. Our mission is to maintain our position as the primary ESD solutions provider for the electronics industry in Europe. Vermason strive to manufacture quality ESD Control products with innovation, leadership and partnerships which deliver long term commercial benefits. We understand the many challenges our customers face regarding quality and reliability. We support these requirements with products and services of exceptional value which help them gain competitive advantages in their markets. We also appreciate that the control of ESD is one of many necessary links in a long chain required to bring a customer’s project to a successful completion. We endeavour to make that happen. We sustain our vision and mission by constantly seeking renewal via continuous education, application of new technologies and good business practices. Employees are expected to serve the customer with the highest level of technical knowledge in the industry.

Posted on 2016-09-22, in How-To, Ionisation. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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